Symposium on Helming, Strickland, and Jacob, “Solving the Puzzle about Early Belief-Ascription”

I am very pleased to launch our latest Mind & Language symposium on Katharina A. Helming, Brent Strickland, and Pierre Jacob’s “Solving the Puzzle about Early Belief-Ascription” from the journal’s September 2016 issue, with commentaries by  Hayley Clatterbuck (Rochester), Marco Fenici (Florence), Daniel Hutto (Wollongong), Josef Perner (Salzburg), Rose Scott (UC Merced),  and Evan Westra with Peter Carruthers (Maryland). 0

Upcoming Events at the Brains blog

With the Minds Online conference now in the rearview mirror we are back to regular programming here at Brains, including two upcoming journal symposia and visits from the authors of several new and forthcoming books: Beginning tomorrow, Tuesday 10/11, Carl Gillett will blog for several days about his book Reduction and Emergence in …

Symposium on Bence Nanay, “The Role of Imagination in Decision-Making”

I’m happy to kick off our latest Mind & Language symposium on Bence Nanay’s  “The Role of Imagination in Decision-Making,” from the journal’s February 2016 issue, with commentaries by Amy Kind (Claremont McKenna ) and Neil Van Leeuwen (Georgia State). The psychological process of decision-making is often explained in terms of an agent’s beliefs and desires (or other pro-attitudes): practical reasoning is essentially a …

Neuroethics Symposium on Tobia’s “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics”

Welcome to our second Brains Blog symposium on papers published in the journal Neuroethics. Our target paper for this symposium is Kevin Tobia’s (Yale University) “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics.” Below you will find an introduction to the symposium and brief précis of the paper, followed by commentaries written …

Open Access: Tobia’s “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics”

In advance of this week’s online symposium, our second on papers published in the journal Neuroethics, Springer has kindly agreed to make our target paper “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics” open access.  The paper presents an experiment suggesting that not just magnitude of change but also direction of …

Call for commentators: “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics”

Brains invites philosophers and academics in other relevant disciplines to act as a commentator for our upcoming symposium, the second in our series on papers published in the journal Neuroethics. The target paper by Kevin Tobia (Yale) is titled “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics” (abstract below). We are looking …

Symposium on Hayley Clatterbuck, “Chimpanzee Mindreading and the Value of Parsimonious Mental Models”

I’m happy to initiate our latest Mind & Language symposium on  Hayley Clatterbucks’s  “Chimpanzee Mindreading and the Value of Parsimonious Mental Models,” from the journal’s September 2015 issue, with commentaries by Cameron Buckner (Houston), Shannon Spaulding (Oklahoma), and Jennifer Vonk (Oakland). There has been a long-standing debate about whether apes, dogs, corvids, and possibly other animals have the capacity to engage in …

Neuroethics Symposium on Focquaert & Schermer, “Moral Enhancement: Do Means Matter Morally?”

I am pleased to kick off our new symposium series on articles published in the journal Neuroethics with a discussion of Farah Focquaert and Maartje Schermer’s paper “Moral Enhancement: Do Means Matter Morally?” Below you will find a video introduction of the paper by the authors, together with a written introduction that …

Symposium on Bernard Molyneux, “The Logic of Mind-Body Identification”

It’s my pleasure to introduce this symposium on Bernard Molyneux’s paper “The Logic of Mind-Body Identification” (in the current issue of Ergo), with commentaries by Liz Irvine (Cardiff), István Aranyosi (Bilkent), and Jonathan Simon (NYU). Molyneux’s paper introduces a new strategy for explaining why proposed identities between the mental and …

Symposium on Martin & Le Corre, “Sensory Substitution Is Substitution”

I am glad to kick off our latest Mind & Language symposium on Jean-Rémy Martin and François Le Corre‘s “Sensory Substitution Is Substitution ,” from the journal’s April 2015 issue, with commentaries by Kevin Connolly (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Penn), Ophelia Deroy (Center for the Study of the Senses/Institute of Philosophy, University of London), Julian Kiverstein (Amsterdam), and Michael Proulx (Bath). 1+

Upcoming Mind & Language Symposium

I’m happy to announce that our next Mind & Language symposium will be on Jean-Rémy Martin and François Le Corre’s “Sensory Substitution is Substitution” from the journal’s April 2015 issue. Thanks to the generous support of Wiley-Blackwell and the journal’s editors, the target article is now available in open access at the link above. …

Symposium on Aaron Norby, “Uncertainty Without All the Doubt”

I am happy to announce that our next Mind & Language symposium is on Aaron Norby’s “Uncertainty Without All the Doubt“ from the journal’s February 2015 issue with commentaries by Keith Frankish (Open University), Jennifer Nagel (Toronto), and Nicholas J.J. Smith (Sydney). Philosophical discussions of rationality and decision making are freqeuntly structured by the …

Symposium on Wayne Wu, “Against Division: Consciousness, Information, and the Visual Streams” (Mind & Language 29 (4), 383–406)

I am pleased to announce that our next Mind & Language symposium is on Wayne Wu’s “Against Division: Consciousness, Information and the Visual Streams,” from the journal’s September 2014 issue, with commentaries by David Kaplan (Macquarie), Pete Mandik (William Paterson), and Thomas Schenk (Erlangen-Nuremberg). According to the influential dual systems model of visual processing …

Symposium on Philipp Koralus, “The Erotetic Theory of Attention” (Mind & Language 29 (1), 26-50)

Our next Mind & Language article symposium is on Philipp Koralus’ paper, “The Erotetic Theory of Attention: Questions, Focus and Distraction”, from the journal’s February 2014 issue, with commentaries by Felipe De Brigard, Christopher Mole, Catherine Stinson, and Sebastian Watzl. In his paper, Philipp argues that the functional role of attention …

Symposium on Butterfill and Apperly’s “How to Construct a Minimal Theory of Mind” (Mind & Language 28, 606-637)

With apologies for the delay, I’m glad to begin our next Mind & Language symposium, on Stephen Butterfill and Ian Apperly’s article “How to Construct a Minimal Theory of Mind”, with commentaries by Hannes Rakoczy (Göttingen), Shannon Spaulding (Oklahoma State), and Tad Zawidzki (George Washington University). 0