Introduction to Causation With A Human Face

How should philosophers (and others) approach the topic of causation and causal reasoning? Causation with a Human Face (CHF) proposes an approach that brings together results from a number of different disciplines, both descriptive ( e.g., the empirical psychology of causal cognition) and normative (statistics, econometrics, machine learning,  philosophy).  The guiding idea is that   causal …

John Zeimbekis: Malleability or cognitive effects on recognition?

John Zeimbekis It’s a relief to see a new book about how perception interacts with thought. Decades of work on modularity and other distinguishing traits of perception (perception as nonconceptual, analog, iconic, unstructured) leave us with a picture of thought as informationally separate from perception, but few suggestions about how …

Jonna Vance: Vicious Perceptual Expertise

Jonna Vance (she/her) Northern Arizona University jonnavance.com [Note: All citations are to Stokes (2021) Thinking and Perceiving (Routledge), unless otherwise noted.] In the final few chapters of Thinking and Perceiving, Stokes turns to perceptual expertise: an enhanced capacity for perceptual recognition or discrimination. In Chapter 6, Stokes offers a pluralistic …

Becko Copenhaver: Comments on Stokes

Becko Copenhaver Washington University, St. Louis “We are, all of us, potential perceptual experts.”  (Dustin Stokes, Thinking and Perceiving, p. 234) I’m grateful to discuss Dustin’s Thinking and Perceiving. I agree with him so much, about so much, that I hope our points of departure will be revealing. For example, …

Unthinkable Pasts and Undreamable Futures: A Role of History for Scientists

I am not a historian. This thought did not occur to me when I set out three years ago to write a book about my field of computational neuroscience, but it has occurred to me many times since. I knew I wanted the book be more than just be a …

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