Cognitive Science of Philosophy Symposium: Philosophy of Perception in the Laboratory

Welcome to the Brains Blog’s Symposium series on the Cognitive Science of Philosophy! The aim of the series is to examine the use of methods from the cognitive sciences to generate philosophical insight. Each symposium is comprised of two parts. In the target post, a practitioner describes their use of …

Cognitive Science of Philosophy Symposium: Metaethics and Experimental Philosophy

Welcome to the Brains Blog’s Symposium series on the Cognitive Science of Philosophy! The aim of the series is to examine the use of methods from the cognitive sciences to generate philosophical insight. Each symposium is comprised of two parts. In the target post, a practitioner describes their use of …

Symposium on Bence Nanay’s “Motor Imagery and Action Execution”

It’s my pleasure to introduce our latest Ergo symposium. This week we are showcasing Bence Nanay’s (Antwerp) “Motor Imagery and Action Execution”, with commentaries by Wayne Christensen (Barcelona), Myrto Mylopoulos (Carlton), and Elisabeth Pacherie (Jean-Nicold). Let me begin by thanking each of the participants for their excellent contributions!

Online Community-Building: The experience of Neural Mechanisms Online (Est. 2018)

It is often said that online-shift prompt by the COVID-19 outbreak might represent the only positive aspect of the tragic events that are today shocking the world. Today, the advantages of online conferences and meetings, particularly in light of their inclusivity and low environmental impact, are for all to see. Synchronous (i.e., …

Not Just Conferences: Online Workshops, Seminars, Colloquia, etc.

The Brains blog started in 2005. By 2006, Thomas Nadelhoffer had organized the first Online Philosophy Conference, featuring papers and commentaries from well-known figures in the field. By 2009, Richard Brown was organizing Consciousness Online, complete with video presentations and commentaries. It took over a decade and a pandemic to …

Continuing the Case for Online Conferences

By Rose Trappes and TJ Perkins With the optimism about the unprecedented development and distribution of a vaccine comes the hope for a return to normal. For many philosophers, this includes a desire to travel to attend conferences. But a return to in-person conferences doesn’t leave everyone jumping with joy. …

Commentary by Jonathan Gilmore on Explaining Imagination

By Jonathan Gilmore Peter Langland-Hassan’s Explaining Imagination is a bracing attack on what approaches orthodoxy in the study of the imagination – that, in its myriad roles in explanations of human thought and behavior, it is a sui generis cognitive attitude.  Dissenting from the consensus, Langland-Hassan argues that invocations of …

Commentary by Alon Chasid on Explaining Imagination (with reply)

By Alon Chasid Peter Langland-Hassan’s Explaining Imagination (hereafter: EI) presents a reductive thesis: imagining is not a sui generis mental state or attitude, but one of the basic folk- psychological attitudes such as beliefs, judgments (i.e., occurrent beliefs), desires, intentions, etc., or combinations thereof. At first sight, this novel thesis …

Imagination Between Bats and Cats: Commentary by Margherita Arcangeli on Explaining Imagination (with reply)

By Margherita Arcangelia Imagination is clearly “a dense and tangled piece of country” (Furlong 1961: 15). The last decade, however, saw considerable philosophical work aimed at mapping this terrain of the mind. Peter Langland-Hassan’s book is a sophisticated and thought provoking atlas, whose purpose is to show that where other …

Book Symposium: Explaining Imagination — Précis

Greetings Brains Blog readers!  I am very pleased to begin a weeklong Brains Blog symposium on my book, Explaining Imagination (OUP, 2020).  The entire book is available as an open access download HERE, for those interested in following along at home.  I begin today with a précis articulating the book’s …

Cognitive Science of Philosophy Symposium: Adversarial Collaboration

Welcome to the Brains Blog’s Symposium series on the Cognitive Science of Philosophy! The aim of the series is to examine the use of methods from the cognitive sciences to generate philosophical insight. Each symposium is comprised of two parts. In the target post, a practitioner describes their use of …

Cognitive Science of Philosophy Symposium: Corpus Analysis

Welcome to the Brains Blog’s new Symposium series on the Cognitive Science of Philosophy! The aim of the series is to examine the use of methods from the cognitive sciences to generate philosophical insight. Each symposium is comprised of two parts. In the target post, a practitioner describes their use …

Symposium on Joseph Gottlieb’s “Verbal Disputes in the Theory of Consciousness”

It’s my pleasure to introduce our next Ergo symposium, featuring Joseph Gottlieb’s “Verbal Disputes in the Theory of Consciousness“, including commentaries by Jonathan Farrell, Assaf Weksler, and Josh Weisberg. I’d like begin by thanking each of the participants for their great work.

Symposium on Michel and Morales, “Minority Reports: Consciousness and the Prefrontal Cortex”

I’m very pleased to announce our latest Mind & Language symposium on Matthias Michel and Jorge Morales’ forthcoming “Minority Reports: Consciousness and the Prefrontal Cortex.” Our outstanding commentators on the target article include Liz Irvine (Cardiff), Benjamin Kozuch (Alabama), and Michael Pitts with Kevin Ortego (Reed College). 

Symposium on Fischer et. al. ‘Experimental Ordinary Language Philosophy’

In ‘Experimental ordinary language philosophy: a cross-linguistic investigation of default inferences’, (Synthese, 2019) Eugen Fischer, Paul Engelhard, Joachim Horvath and Hiroshi Ohtani seek to take experimental philosophy beyond the study of intuitions and highlight links to one of its historical precursors. They show how experimental methods and findings from psycholinguistics …

Symposium on Bayne, “On the axiomatic foundations of the integrated information theory of consciousness”

I am delighted to announce the next symposium in our series on articles from Neuroscience of Consciousness.  Neuroscience of Consciousness is an interdisciplinary journal focused on the philosophy and science of consciousness, and gladly accepts submissions from both philosophers and scientists working in this fascinating field. We have two types …

Symposium on Letheby and Gerrans, “Self unbound: ego dissolution in psychedelic experience”

I am delighted to announce the next symposium in our series on articles from Neuroscience of Consciousness.  Neuroscience of Consciousness is an interdisciplinary journal focused on the philosophy and science of consciousness, and gladly accepts submissions from both philosophers and scientists working in this fascinating field. We have two types …

European Journal of Analytic Philosophy Symposium: Special Issue on Psychopathy

(Below Marko Jurjako introduces a recent EuJAP special issue on psychopathy that he co-edited. For this symposium, three authors of papers published in the special issue have written commentaries on other papers in the issue. I hope readers enjoy the discussion! – KLS)  Research on the ethical, legal, and empirical …

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