European Journal of Analytic Philosophy Symposium: Special Issue on Psychopathy

(Below Marko Jurjako introduces a recent EuJAP special issue on psychopathy that he co-edited. For this symposium, three authors of papers published in the special issue have written commentaries on other papers in the issue. I hope readers enjoy the discussion! – KLS)  Research on the ethical, legal, and empirical …

Symposium on Christoph Hoerl’s “Experience and Time: Transparency and Presence”

It’s my pleasure to introduce our next Ergo symposium, featuring Christoph Hoerl’s “Experience and Time: Transparency and Presence” with commentaries by Elliot Carter (University of Toronto) Geoffrey Lee (University of California, Berkeley), Louise Richardson (University of York). I’d like to thank each of the participants for their great work!

Symposium on Joshua Shepherd’s “Halfhearted Action and Control”

Welcome to our fifth Ergo symposium. This week we are showcasing Joshua Shepherd’s paper “Halfhearted Action and Control”, with commentaries by Andreas Elpidorou (Louisville), Nora Heinzelmann (Munich), and Zachary Irving (Virginia). Let me begin by thanking all the participants for their great work! Shepherd introduces his topic with a possibly familiar …

Symposium on Del Pinal and Spaulding, “Conceptual Centrality and Implicit Bias”

I’m very glad to announce our latest Mind & Language symposium on Guillermo Del Pinal and Shannon Spaulding’s “Conceptual Centrality and Implicit Bias” from the journal’s February 2018 issue. Commentators on the target article include Bryce Huebner (Georgetown), Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh), Eric Mandelbaum (CUNY), Steven Sloman (Brown), and Ema Sullivan-Bissett (Birmingham). *** The term “implicit bias” is typically used refer …

Symposium on Haun, Tononi, Koch, and Tsuchiya: “Are we underestimating the richness of visual experience?”

I am delighted to announce the next symposium in our series on articles from Neuroscience of Consciousness.  We have two types of symposia.  For primarily theoretical articles, we will have several commentators from a variety of theoretical perspectives.  For novel empirical research, we will have single commentators whose goal is …

Symposium on Pendaran Roberts, Keith Allen, and Kelly-Ann Schmidtke’s “Folk Intuitions about the Causal Theory of Perception”

Welcome to our fourth Ergo symposium, featuring Pendaran Roberts (University of Warwick), Keith Allen (University of York), and Kelly-Ann Schmidtke’s (University of Warwick) “Folk Intuitions about the Causal Theory of Perception” with commentaries by Eugen Fischer (University of East Anglia) and John Schwenkler (Florida State University). I’d like to thank …

Symposium on Isham et al.: “Deliberation period during easy and difficult decisions: Re-examining Libet’s ‘veto’ window in a more ecologically valid framework”

I am delighted to announce the second in our series of symposia on articles from Neuroscience of Consciousness.  We have two types of symposia.  For primarily theoretical articles, such as in last week’s post, we will have several commentators from a variety of theoretical perspectives.  For novel empirical research, we …

Symposium on Shea and Frith: “Dual-process theories and consciousness: the case for ‘Type Zero’ cognition”

I am thrilled to introduce our first symposium in a series on articles from Neuroscience of Consciousness, on Nicholas Shea and Chris Frith’s “Dual-process theories and consciousness: the case for ‘Type Zero’ cognition.”  We have three excellent commentaries on the paper, by Jacob Berger, Nick Byrd, and Elizabeth Schechter, along …

Symposium on Gross and Flombaum, “Does Perceptual Consciousness Overflow Cognitive Access? The Challenge from Probabilistic, Hierarchical Processes”

It’s a pleasure to launch our latest Mind & Language symposium on Steven Gross and Jonathan Flombaum’s “Does Perceptual Consciousness Overflow Cognitive Access? The Challenge from Probabilistic, Hierarchical Processes” from the journal’s June 2017 issue. Our commentators include Jacob Beck (York), Nico Orlandi writing with Aaron Franklin (UC Santa Cruz), and Ian Phillips (Oxford). How are the neural …

Neuroethics Symposium: Special Issue on The Biology of Desire by Marc Lewis

It is my pleasure to introduce the latest in our series of symposia on papers from the journal Neuroethics. The focus of the current symposium is a forthcoming special issue of Neuroethics on Marc Lewis‘s book The Biology of Desire: Why Addiction Is Not a Disease (PublicAffairs, 2016). In his book, Lewis challenges the …

Symposium on Alex Madva’s “A Plea for Anti-Anti-Individualism”

It’s my pleasure to introduce our third Ergo symposium, featuring Alex Madva’s “A Plea for Anti-Anti-Individualism: How Oversimple Psychology Misleads Social Policy” with commentaries by Saray Ayala-Lopez (California State University, Sacramento), Sally Haslanger (MIT), and Jennifer Saul (University of Sheffield). I’d like to thank each of the participants for their great …

Symposium on Helming, Strickland, and Jacob, “Solving the Puzzle about Early Belief-Ascription”

I am very pleased to launch our latest Mind & Language symposium on Katharina A. Helming, Brent Strickland, and Pierre Jacob’s “Solving the Puzzle about Early Belief-Ascription” from the journal’s September 2016 issue, with commentaries by  Hayley Clatterbuck (Rochester), Marco Fenici (Florence), Daniel Hutto (Wollongong), Josef Perner (Salzburg), Rose Scott (UC Merced),  and Evan Westra with Peter Carruthers (Maryland).

Upcoming Events at the Brains blog

With the Minds Online conference now in the rearview mirror we are back to regular programming here at Brains, including two upcoming journal symposia and visits from the authors of several new and forthcoming books: Beginning tomorrow, Tuesday 10/11, Carl Gillett will blog for several days about his book Reduction and Emergence in …

Symposium on Bence Nanay, “The Role of Imagination in Decision-Making”

I’m happy to kick off our latest Mind & Language symposium on Bence Nanay’s  “The Role of Imagination in Decision-Making,” from the journal’s February 2016 issue, with commentaries by Amy Kind (Claremont McKenna ) and Neil Van Leeuwen (Georgia State). The psychological process of decision-making is often explained in terms of an agent’s beliefs and desires (or other pro-attitudes): practical reasoning is essentially a …

Neuroethics Symposium on Tobia’s “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics”

Welcome to our second Brains Blog symposium on papers published in the journal Neuroethics. Our target paper for this symposium is Kevin Tobia’s (Yale University) “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics.” Below you will find an introduction to the symposium and brief précis of the paper, followed by commentaries written …

Open Access: Tobia’s “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics”

In advance of this week’s online symposium, our second on papers published in the journal Neuroethics, Springer has kindly agreed to make our target paper “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics” open access.  The paper presents an experiment suggesting that not just magnitude of change but also direction of …

Call for commentators: “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics”

Brains invites philosophers and academics in other relevant disciplines to act as a commentator for our upcoming symposium, the second in our series on papers published in the journal Neuroethics. The target paper by Kevin Tobia (Yale) is titled “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics” (abstract below). We are looking …

Symposium on Boyd Millar’s “Naïve Realism and Illusion”

I’m pleased to introduce our second Ergo symposium, featuring Boyd Millar’s “Naïve Realism and Illusion” with commentaries by Craig French (Cambridge) and James Genone (Rutgers). Thanks to each of the participants for their excellent work and to John Schwenkler for helping me put the symposium together.

Symposium on Hayley Clatterbuck, “Chimpanzee Mindreading and the Value of Parsimonious Mental Models”

I’m happy to initiate our latest Mind & Language symposium on  Hayley Clatterbucks’s  “Chimpanzee Mindreading and the Value of Parsimonious Mental Models,” from the journal’s September 2015 issue, with commentaries by Cameron Buckner (Houston), Shannon Spaulding (Oklahoma), and Jennifer Vonk (Oakland). There has been a long-standing debate about whether apes, dogs, corvids, and possibly other animals have the capacity to engage in …

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