Epistemic Injustice and Implicit Bias

This post about epistemic in justice and implicit bias by Kathy Puddifoot and Jules Holroyd is the fourth and final post of this week’s series on An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind (Routledge, 2020). Find the other posts here. Epistemic injustice occurs when a person …

The Limitations of Implicit Bias

This post about epistemic in justice and implicit bias by Susanna Siegel is the third post of this week’s series on An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind (Routledge, 2020). Find the other posts here. The first waves of research in psychology surrounding implicit bias claimed …

The Embodied Biased Mind

This post about embodied cognition and implicit bias by Céline Leboeuf is the second post of this week’s series on An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind (Routledge, 2020). Find the other posts here. We often think of our mental lives as “in our heads.” This …

Trust and Testimony in Social Learning

Natural pedagogy focuses on knowledge transfer and how such transfer may occur. The theory describes a communicative relationship which is, by definition, an exchange influenced and determined by the principle of epistemic primacy that portrays infants as «avid seekers of information provided by others» (Poulin-Dubois et al. 2010, p. 303). …

Learning through … Natural Pedagogy

The book Learning through Others (2020) illustrates and discusses the infant social learning theory called “Natural Pedagogy”. The natural pedagogy theory, proposed by György Gergely and Gergely Csibra, has the ambitious scope of providing a model of infant social learning. This particular social learning system is funded on a communicative …

4. What makes a social emotion?

An important aspect of emotions that is relatively neglected in both the philosophical and psychological literature is their social manifestation. There is plenty of work on empathy, the role of emotions in morality, and even a growing interest in emotional expression, but all this should be tied together with a …

Epistemic and Ethical Implications

Most philosophical discussions of mindreading stay squarely within the realm of philosophy of psychology. Theorizing about mindreading plays a role in debates about the modularity of the mind, the representational theory of mind, language development, the semantics of ordinary language use, etc. Using mindreading as a case study for understanding …

A Broader Conception of Mindreading

In the previous two posts, I examined challenges to the view that we regularly attribute mental states to others and explain and predict their behavior. Although these challenges do not show that mindreading is a rarely used or relatively unimportant tool, they do highlight how limited the ordinary conception of …

Pluralistic Folk Psychology

In the first post, I considered the 4-E objection that mindreading is not an important, frequently used tool in our folk psychological toolkit. I argued that mindreading accounts can withstand this challenge. We do regularly attribute mental states to others and explain and predict their behavior. Nevertheless, such challenges open the …

How We Understand Others

A question that has long interested me is how we understand others – that is, what are the cognitive processes that underlie successful social understanding and interaction – and what happens when we misunderstand others. In philosophy and the cognitive sciences, the orthodox view is that understanding and interacting with …

Symposium on Del Pinal and Spaulding, “Conceptual Centrality and Implicit Bias”

I’m very glad to announce our latest Mind & Language symposium on Guillermo Del Pinal and Shannon Spaulding’s “Conceptual Centrality and Implicit Bias” from the journal’s February 2018 issue. Commentators on the target article include Bryce Huebner (Georgetown), Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh), Eric Mandelbaum (CUNY), Steven Sloman (Brown), and Ema Sullivan-Bissett (Birmingham). *** The term “implicit bias” is typically used refer …

Call for Papers: Expanding Perception: The Role of Touch in Comparative Psychology, IJCP Special Issue

Call for Papers: Expanding Perception: The Role of Touch in Comparative Psychology, IJCP Special Issue  In recent years, researchers have begun to include diverse modes of perception in an effort to understand cognitive and affective processes in various species. In this special issue, we are interested in an interdisciplinary account …

The 3rd Annual Minds Online Conference Starts Monday!

Mark your calendars! The conference starts Monday and runs for three weeks. The first session’s papers are already posted. Commenting for the first session starts Monday. Check out the full post for the rest of the details.

Morality, the Problem of Possible Future Selves, and Christmas Parables

In my 2016 book, Rightness as Fairness: A Moral and Political Theory, I argue that morality is a solution to a problem of diachronic rationality called ‘the problem of possible future selves.’ To simplify (very) greatly, the problem–which is partially inspired by L.A. Paul’s groundbreaking work on transformative experience–is that (A) our present …

CFP: Zahavi on Self and Other (Bochum)

Call for Papers and Workshop Announcement Ruhr-Universität Bochum June 20-22, 2016 Prof. Dan Zahavi (University of Copenhagen): Lectures on Self and Other Dan Zahavi is Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center for Subjectivity Research at the University of Copenhagen. He is the author of various books on Husserl’s Phenomenology, …

Three Studies That No Moral Philosopher Should Ignore

Robin Zheng Newnham College University of Cambridge In my chapter, I argue that for cases of implicitly biased action, we should set aside questions of responsibility as attributability in favor of responsibility as accountability. As I interpret the distinction, the former constitute a problem in metaphysics and philosophy of action because we are …

How Can A Stereotype You Don’t Believe Affect You?

Stacey Goguen Boston University One of the striking aspects of stereotype threat is that it demonstrates ways in which a stereotype that you might not necessarily believe (and perhaps even likely do not believe) can nonetheless significantly affect you cognitively and psychologically.  For instance, math majors who are primed to think about …