How We Understand Others

A question that has long interested me is how we understand others – that is, what are the cognitive processes that underlie successful social understanding and interaction – and what happens when we misunderstand others. In philosophy and the cognitive sciences, the orthodox view is that understanding and interacting with …

Symposium on Del Pinal and Spaulding, “Conceptual Centrality and Implicit Bias”

I’m very glad to announce our latest Mind & Language symposium on Guillermo Del Pinal and Shannon Spaulding’s “Conceptual Centrality and Implicit Bias” from the journal’s February 2018 issue. Commentators on the target article include Bryce Huebner (Georgetown), Edouard Machery (Pittsburgh), Eric Mandelbaum (CUNY), Steven Sloman (Brown), and Ema Sullivan-Bissett (Birmingham). *** The term “implicit bias” is typically used refer …

Call for Papers: Expanding Perception: The Role of Touch in Comparative Psychology, IJCP Special Issue

Call for Papers: Expanding Perception: The Role of Touch in Comparative Psychology, IJCP Special Issue  In recent years, researchers have begun to include diverse modes of perception in an effort to understand cognitive and affective processes in various species. In this special issue, we are interested in an interdisciplinary account …

The 3rd Annual Minds Online Conference Starts Monday!

Mark your calendars! The conference starts Monday and runs for three weeks. The first session’s papers are already posted. Commenting for the first session starts Monday. Check out the full post for the rest of the details.

Morality, the Problem of Possible Future Selves, and Christmas Parables

In my 2016 book, Rightness as Fairness: A Moral and Political Theory, I argue that morality is a solution to a problem of diachronic rationality called ‘the problem of possible future selves.’ To simplify (very) greatly, the problem–which is partially inspired by L.A. Paul’s groundbreaking work on transformative experience–is that (A) our present …

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