CFA: Philosophy and Neuroscience at the Gulf III

The third Neuroscience at the Gulf workshop is co-organized by John Bickle (Mississippi State University and University of Mississippi Medical Center) and Antonella Tramacere (Mississippi State University and Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany). October 9-10, 2020 (format pending) Topics Epigenetics in the nervous system Neuroscience …

Russ Poldrack will live-stream “The Physics of Representation” Friday

We’re excited about another free livestream this Friday (May 8, 1400-1600 GMT), this time from Russ Poldrack titled “The Physics of Representation”. Thanks to the Neural Mechanisms team for making these livestreams possible!

Adina Roskies will live-stream “Representational Similarity Analysis in neuroimaging…” this Friday

We are excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. As always, it is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join sign up for the mailing list that notifies people about upcoming …

Zina Ward will live stream a new approach to “…Data Aggregation Across Brains” on Friday

We are excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. As always, it is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join sign up for the mailing list that notifies people about upcoming …

CFP: Neural Correlates of Consciousness

Philosophy and the Mind Sciences is inviting contributions to a celebratory volume on the neural correlates of consciousness. In 2000, MIT published „Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Empirical and Conceptual Questions“, edited by Thomas Metzinger. The volume brought together empirical neuroscientists, psychologists, anaesthesiologists, and philosophers, all participants at the 2nd ASSC meeting …

2. Do Experts Really Perceive the World Differently from Non-Experts?

People sometimes say things like the following: Cabernet Sauvignon tastes different to an expert wine taster than to a novice; or, Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony sounds different to a seasoned conductor than it does to someone just hearing it for the first time. But does wine literally taste differently (or the …

Vincente Raja & Michael Anderson’s “Behavior Considered as an Enabling Constraint”

The Brains blog is excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. It is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join their mailing list to be notified of their webinars, webconferences, and …

3. Introducing Cognitive Structures

In the previous post, I have remarked that the existing forms of SR do not use the full capacity of their logical frameworks to account for a substantial relation between the structure of the scientific theories and reality. If we regiment the structure of scientific theories into formal frameworks that …

Karen Yan on ​Causal Investigative Strategies in Neurophysiology

The next Neural Mechanisms webinar is Friday (22nd) 8-10 Greenwich Mean Time: Karen YAN (National Yang-Ming University) presents “Evaluating the Success of Causal Investigative Strategies in Neurophysiology”. Find out about the paper and how to join the webinar in this post.

Empirically-Informed Approaches to Weakness of Will: A Brains Blog Roundtable

Weakness of will is a traditional puzzle in the philosophy of action. The puzzle goes something like this:

FOLK PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORY: If, at time t, an agent judges that it is better to do A than B, and she believes she is free to do A, then, provided she tries to do either at that time, she will try to do A and not B.

WEAKNESS OF WILL: An agent judges that it is better to do A than B, believes that she is free to do A, but tries to do B.

But taken together, these statements are inconsistent. FOLK PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORY precludes the possibility of weakness of will (as characterized in WEAKNESS OF WILL), but WEAKNESS OF WILL asserts that it occurs. So can WEAKNESS OF WILL be possible, and if so, how?

The Foundations of Perception

  Yesterday, I gave a general overview of my forthcoming book. Today, I’ll lay out the foundations on which the rest of the book builds: the general and particular elements of perception. Chapter 1 addresses the particular elements of perception, Chapter 2 its general elements. The phenomenon of perceptual particularity …

Neural Mechanisms Online 2018: An Interim Report — and call for discussants

[The following is a guest post by the organizers of Neural Mechanisms Online. — JS] Neural Mechanisms Online 2018 is a cycle of webinars (i.e. web seminars) on the philosophy of neuroscience. The speakers are several philosophers from all around the world, either junior or senior (see the calendar). The …

Evolving Enactivism: Neurodynamics sans content

In a direct challenge to radical, anti-representational proposals about how to conceive of cognition, Aizawa (2015) asks “If the brain does not contribute information processing or symbol manipulation or the transformation of representations … then what does it do?” (2015, 761–762). Given that REC embraces precisely such radicalisms, what alternative …

Neural Mechanisms Online

We are very pleased to announce the beginning of Neural Mechanisms Online, i.e. the first international cycle of webinars (=online seminars) on the Philosophy of Neuroscience! The webinars will be held from January to July 2018, every two weeks (see the calendar below). They will deal with hot topics of …

A new action-based theory of spatial perception

by Andrew Glennerster and James Stazicker (Psychology and Philosophy, University of Reading) In both the neuroscience and the philosophy of spatial perception, it is standard to assume that humans represent a perceived scene in either an egocentric or a world-based 3D coordinate frame, and a great deal of work in …

4. Conceptual Emergence and Neural Networks

Conceptual emergence occurs when, in order to understand or effectively represent some phenomenon, a different representational apparatus must be introduced at the current working level. Such changes in representation are common in the sciences but it has usually been considered in connection with changes in synchronic representations. Here, I’ll consider …

Symposium on Isham et al.: “Deliberation period during easy and difficult decisions: Re-examining Libet’s ‘veto’ window in a more ecologically valid framework”

I am delighted to announce the second in our series of symposia on articles from Neuroscience of Consciousness.  We have two types of symposia.  For primarily theoretical articles, such as in last week’s post, we will have several commentators from a variety of theoretical perspectives.  For novel empirical research, we …

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