The Foundations of Perception

  Yesterday, I gave a general overview of my forthcoming book. Today, I’ll lay out the foundations on which the rest of the book builds: the general and particular elements of perception. Chapter 1 addresses the particular elements of perception, Chapter 2 its general elements. The phenomenon of perceptual particularity …

Neural Mechanisms Online 2018: An Interim Report — and call for discussants

[The following is a guest post by the organizers of Neural Mechanisms Online. — JS] Neural Mechanisms Online 2018 is a cycle of webinars (i.e. web seminars) on the philosophy of neuroscience. The speakers are several philosophers from all around the world, either junior or senior (see the calendar). The …

Evolving Enactivism: Neurodynamics sans content

In a direct challenge to radical, anti-representational proposals about how to conceive of cognition, Aizawa (2015) asks “If the brain does not contribute information processing or symbol manipulation or the transformation of representations … then what does it do?” (2015, 761–762). Given that REC embraces precisely such radicalisms, what alternative …

Neural Mechanisms Online

We are very pleased to announce the beginning of Neural Mechanisms Online, i.e. the first international cycle of webinars (=online seminars) on the Philosophy of Neuroscience! The webinars will be held from January to July 2018, every two weeks (see the calendar below). They will deal with hot topics of …

A new action-based theory of spatial perception

by Andrew Glennerster and James Stazicker (Psychology and Philosophy, University of Reading) In both the neuroscience and the philosophy of spatial perception, it is standard to assume that humans represent a perceived scene in either an egocentric or a world-based 3D coordinate frame, and a great deal of work in …

4. Conceptual Emergence and Neural Networks

Conceptual emergence occurs when, in order to understand or effectively represent some phenomenon, a different representational apparatus must be introduced at the current working level. Such changes in representation are common in the sciences but it has usually been considered in connection with changes in synchronic representations. Here, I’ll consider …

Symposium on Isham et al.: “Deliberation period during easy and difficult decisions: Re-examining Libet’s ‘veto’ window in a more ecologically valid framework”

I am delighted to announce the second in our series of symposia on articles from Neuroscience of Consciousness.  We have two types of symposia.  For primarily theoretical articles, such as in last week’s post, we will have several commentators from a variety of theoretical perspectives.  For novel empirical research, we …

Symposium on Gross and Flombaum, “Does Perceptual Consciousness Overflow Cognitive Access? The Challenge from Probabilistic, Hierarchical Processes”

It’s a pleasure to launch our latest Mind & Language symposium on Steven Gross and Jonathan Flombaum’s “Does Perceptual Consciousness Overflow Cognitive Access? The Challenge from Probabilistic, Hierarchical Processes” from the journal’s June 2017 issue. Our commentators include Jacob Beck (York), Nico Orlandi writing with Aaron Franklin (UC Santa Cruz), and Ian Phillips (Oxford). How are the neural …

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