Brains Blog Roundtable: Perceptual Representation

We are very excited about our first ever Brains Blog Roundtable, on “Perceptual Representation”! We have a really fantastic lineup for our first roundtable: joining us for this session are Ned Block (NYU), Susanna Schellenberg (Rutgers), and Susanna Siegel (Harvard). Join us for a spirited discussion about the state of …

John Zeimbekis: Malleability or cognitive effects on recognition?

John Zeimbekis It’s a relief to see a new book about how perception interacts with thought. Decades of work on modularity and other distinguishing traits of perception (perception as nonconceptual, analog, iconic, unstructured) leave us with a picture of thought as informationally separate from perception, but few suggestions about how …

Jonna Vance: Vicious Perceptual Expertise

Jonna Vance (she/her) Northern Arizona University jonnavance.com [Note: All citations are to Stokes (2021) Thinking and Perceiving (Routledge), unless otherwise noted.] In the final few chapters of Thinking and Perceiving, Stokes turns to perceptual expertise: an enhanced capacity for perceptual recognition or discrimination. In Chapter 6, Stokes offers a pluralistic …

Becko Copenhaver: Comments on Stokes

Becko Copenhaver Washington University, St. Louis “We are, all of us, potential perceptual experts.”  (Dustin Stokes, Thinking and Perceiving, p. 234) I’m grateful to discuss Dustin’s Thinking and Perceiving. I agree with him so much, about so much, that I hope our points of departure will be revealing. For example, …

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