Bryce Gessell, (Behind The Stage of) Prediction and Topological Models in Neuroscience

Bryce Gessell (Southern Virginia University) is the first author of this third post in this book symposium for the edited volume Neural Mechanisms: New Challenges in Philosophy of Neuroscience (Springer 2021). We called our chapter “Prediction and Topological Models in Neuroscience,” and we wrote it in the spirit of Jack Gallant. Let …

Daniel Weiskopf, What Decoding Can’t Do

Daniel Weiskopf (Georgia State University) is the author of this third post in this book symposium for the edited volume Neural Mechanisms: New Challenges in Philosophy of Neuroscience (Springer 2021). Neuroimaging has seen major advances in experimental design and data analysis in recent decades. Among these are new methods, provocatively referred to …

Mazviita Chirimuuta, Your Brain Is Like a Computer: Function, Analogy, Simplification

Mazviita Chirimuuta (Edinburgh) is the author of this second post in this book symposium for the edited volume Neural Mechanisms: New Challenges in Philosophy of Neuroscience (Springer 2021). Science is a project of domestication in which the wild forces of nature are tamed and set to work for human advantage. We need …

Is there a philosophy of neuroscience?

The Neural Mechanisms Online Team (Fabrizio Calzavarini & Marco Viola) is grateful to the managing editors of The Brains Blog for the opportunity to present (a selection of chapters from) our edited collection throughout this week. * * * Drawing on the experience and on the network of the homonymous …

David Barack will be live-streaming “Computation with Neural Manifolds” on January 22

We are excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. As always, it is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join sign up for the mailing list that notifies people about upcoming …

Call for Editors: Philosophical Psychology

Find the Call for Editors (below) on Taylor & Francis’s website. Now in its 34th volume and publishing 8 issues a year, Philosophical Psychology has been one of the defining publications for research at the intersection of philosophy and the psychological sciences. Unique in the range and quality of its coverage, it attracts …

Cognitive Science of Philosophy Symposium: Corpus Analysis

Welcome to the Brains Blog’s new Symposium series on the Cognitive Science of Philosophy! The aim of the series is to examine the use of methods from the cognitive sciences to generate philosophical insight. Each symposium is comprised of two parts. In the target post, a practitioner describes their use …

Essay Prize: Neuroscience and Philosophy

Hi Brains! Please consider the exciting essay prize contest hosted by Bence Nanay at the University of Antwerp. Details below. Ninth Annual Essay Prize at the Centre for Philosophical Psychology, University of Antwerp Topic: Neuroscience and philosophy.Eligibility: The Essay Prize is open to those who received their PhD after May …

John Bickle at MSU Weekly Online Chats

We’re happy to announce our first co-hosted talk! This week we are bringing you John Bickle from the MSU Weekly Chat series, a great lineup of talks put together by John and Antonella Tramacere. You can participate in the live talk and Q&A and/or find the talk on the Brains …

Call for Participation: Survey on Mental Representation

Hi there Brains Blog readers. Please see the call for participation below from Edouard Machery and Luis Favela. Call for Participants: Survey on The Concept of Representation in the Mind Sciences  I am Dr. Edouard Machery, Distinguished Professor in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of …

Extending epistemic innocence beyond belief

A picture of continuity Some beliefs are epistemically innocent when they are irrational but provide epistemic benefits that would not be available otherwise. We already saw some examples: delusion, confabulation, and optimistically biased beliefs. Here I explain why I apply epistemic innocence to different types of beliefs across clinical and …

Optimism: ignorance or hope?

Powerful agents We are likely to overestimate our capacities and make exceedingly rosy predictions about our future. This widespread bias towards optimism is a robust finding in psychology. It is also a clear case of epistemic irrationality which has serious implications for risk assessment. According to a recent article, unrealistic …

Confabulation: good, bad, or inevitable?

Incurable confabulators Philosophers sometimes describe humans as rational animals. It would be more accurate to say that we are confabulating animals. The problem is that it is not always easy to distinguish our frequent practice of confabulation from the rare moments when we exercise our rationality. A provocative idea is …

The Epistemic Innocence of Irrational Beliefs

Silver linings I took this photograph in a place that means a lot to me, the lagoon in Nora, Sardinia. It is a wetland which is home to amazing wildlife and also to a rescue centre for injured sea turtles. To me, it is a picture of hope. There are …

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