Neurofunctional Prudence & Morality

I am excited to report that my new book, Neurofunctional Prudence and Morality: A Philosophical Theory, is now available from Routledge ($70 hardback, $12.50+ ebook). Anyone interested can preview the book’s introduction and part of Chapter 1 here at Google Books. Interested readers can also download a pre-published draft of …

Affordances and Motivation

The study of emotions, the so-called affective turn, allows us to rethink crucial elements in psychology and philosophy of mind. There has been a concurrent surge in creative research and theory in the field of ecological psychology.[1] In our book, we seek to clarify the function of affective sentience in …

Marcin Miłkowski’s & Piotr Litwin’s livestream of “Testing Predictive Processing”

We are excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday (21st). As always, it is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join sign up for the mailing list that notifies people about …

York Vision Science Summer School 2020: Most Expenses Paid

CVR-VISTA Vision Science Summer School, 2020 YORK UNIVERSITY, TORONTO, CANADA The Centre for Vision Research (CVR) at York University in Toronto, Canada offers a one-week, most-expenses-paid undergraduate summer school on vision science.  This year’s program will be held June 8-12, 2020. This year’s summer school is being held in cooperation with the Vision: Science to Applications (VISTA) initiative that has …

Symposium on Joseph Gottlieb’s “Verbal Disputes in the Theory of Consciousness”

It’s my pleasure to introduce our next Ergo symposium, featuring Joseph Gottlieb’s “Verbal Disputes in the Theory of Consciousness“, including commentaries by Jonathan Farrell, Assaf Weksler, and Josh Weisberg. I’d like begin by thanking each of the participants for their great work.

CFP: ESPP 2020

The 28th annual meeting of the European Society for Philosophy and Psychology will take place in Leipzig, Germany from August 31 to September 3, 2020. Keynote speakers are Victoria McGeer, Dorit Bar-On, Vicky Southgate and Herbert Clark. The deadline for submissions is April 1. For further details see: https://www.espp2020.com

5. The Positive Semantic Argument

As I emphasized on Wednesday, phenomenal concepts are, in a sense, private. They are acquaintance-based indexicals that aren’t governed by any set of public norms, and which don’t defer to the expertise of others. Nor do they make any commitment to the underlying nature of the states referred to. When …

4. The Negative Semantic Argument

It is important to realize that first-personal phenomenal consciousness is all-or-nothing. Any given mental state is either phenomenally conscious or it isn’t. It makes no sense to talk of degrees of phenomenal consciousness, or partial phenomenal consciousness. This is another place where some of the distinctions drawn in Monday’s post …

3. Reducing the Phenomenal

The phenomenal concept strategy has been pursued by many different authors. The basic idea is to explain the problematic thought experiments (zombies, Mary, and the explanatory gap) in terms of the distinctive set of concepts we can use when thinking about our own access-conscious nonconceptual mental states. People differ over …