Nikolaus Kriegeskorte will livestream “Peeling the Onion of Brain Representations” on [Date TBD]

We are excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. As always, it is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join sign up for the mailing list that notifies people about upcoming …

Commentary by Jonathan Gilmore on Explaining Imagination

By Jonathan Gilmore Peter Langland-Hassan’s Explaining Imagination is a bracing attack on what approaches orthodoxy in the study of the imagination – that, in its myriad roles in explanations of human thought and behavior, it is a sui generis cognitive attitude.  Dissenting from the consensus, Langland-Hassan argues that invocations of …

Commentary by Alon Chasid on Explaining Imagination (with reply)

By Alon Chasid Peter Langland-Hassan’s Explaining Imagination (hereafter: EI) presents a reductive thesis: imagining is not a sui generis mental state or attitude, but one of the basic folk- psychological attitudes such as beliefs, judgments (i.e., occurrent beliefs), desires, intentions, etc., or combinations thereof. At first sight, this novel thesis …

Imagination Between Bats and Cats: Commentary by Margherita Arcangeli on Explaining Imagination (with reply)

By Margherita Arcangelia Imagination is clearly “a dense and tangled piece of country” (Furlong 1961: 15). The last decade, however, saw considerable philosophical work aimed at mapping this terrain of the mind. Peter Langland-Hassan’s book is a sophisticated and thought provoking atlas, whose purpose is to show that where other …

Book Symposium: Explaining Imagination — Précis

Greetings Brains Blog readers!  I am very pleased to begin a weeklong Brains Blog symposium on my book, Explaining Imagination (OUP, 2020).  The entire book is available as an open access download HERE, for those interested in following along at home.  I begin today with a précis articulating the book’s …

Lauren Ross will livestream “Tracers In Neuroscience” on February 19

We are excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. As always, it is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join sign up for the mailing list that notifies people about upcoming …

Neurorights in Chile: The Philosophical Debate online March 17-19

Announcing the “Neurorights in Chile: The Philosophical Debate” about the Chilean Senate’s Constitutional Reform Bill (Bulletin 13.827-19) and the Neuroprotection Bill of Law (Bulletin 13.828-19) that introduce five key “neurorights”: The Right to Personal Identity, The Right to Free-Will, The Right to Mental Privacy, The Right to Equal Access to …

Reminder: Two Publishing Venues in the Philosophy of Neuroscience

I periodically remind people of a couple of venues for work in the philosophy of neuroscience: The Synthese Topical Collection on Neuroscience and Its Philosophy. The deadline is purely nominal; submissions are processed as they come in and published online shortly after acceptance. To be considered, you need to submit …

Cognitive Science of Philosophy Symposium: Adversarial Collaboration

Welcome to the Brains Blog’s Symposium series on the Cognitive Science of Philosophy! The aim of the series is to examine the use of methods from the cognitive sciences to generate philosophical insight. Each symposium is comprised of two parts. In the target post, a practitioner describes their use of …

John Bickle with livestream “Tinkering in the lab” on Feb 5

We are excited about the next Neural Mechanisms webinar this Friday. As always, it is free. You can find information about how and when to join the webinar below or at the Neural Mechanisms website—where you can also join sign up for the mailing list that notifies people about upcoming …

Cognitive Control: Inhibitory control

Inhibition is arguably the function most colloquially associated with cognitive control. When we think of self-control or willpower, it is often our ability to stop ourselves from doing unwanted, distracting, or maladaptive tasks that we are thinking about. And it follows that the construct of inhibition has played a significant …

Cognitive Control: Working Memory Gating (Part 1)

In today’s post, I will introduce an example of one proposed mechanism of cognitive control that is discussed in detail in my book, On Task. This is the mechanism of working memory gating. Consider an example of an everyday act of control. You are driving your car when your cell …

Daniel Burnston & Philipp Haueis, Evolving Concepts of “Hierarchy” in Systems Neuroscience

Daniel Burnston (Tulane University) and Philipp Haueis (Bielefeld University) are the authors of this last post in this book symposium for the edited volume Neural Mechanisms: New Challenges in Philosophy of Neuroscience (Springer 2021). Concepts in science change over time.  As new results are discovered and incorporated into an existing theoretical framework, …

Bryce Gessell, (Behind The Stage of) Prediction and Topological Models in Neuroscience

Bryce Gessell (Southern Virginia University) is the first author of this third post in this book symposium for the edited volume Neural Mechanisms: New Challenges in Philosophy of Neuroscience (Springer 2021). We called our chapter “Prediction and Topological Models in Neuroscience,” and we wrote it in the spirit of Jack Gallant. Let …

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